Election equipment for Monroe County passes logic, accuracy test

Monroe County’s election equipment, manufactured by Hart InterCivic has passed the logic and accuracy test mandated under state statute.

The test was conducted with help from Bob and Lori White, with B&L IT Services, which is a contractor the county uses for logistics and technical support in connection with elections.

The test took place at 9:30 a.m. on Monday at the old Johnson Hardware building at 7th and Madison streets, aka Election Central.

After a test deck of 22 ballots was fed into each of the three machines, and the machines tallied up the results, every candidate in every race received 4 votes. That meant the devices selected for testing passed with 100 percent accuracy. Continue reading “Election equipment for Monroe County passes logic, accuracy test”

Monroe County voting machines pass required logic and accuracy test

Every candidate for any office in the Monroe County primary elections got exactly six votes—and that’s the way it was supposed to turn out on Thursday.

Two seated women feed test ballots into a voting machine
From left, Monroe County clerk’s office staff: Tressia Martin and Keeley Hardiman.

The occasion was the logic and accuracy test of voting equipment that’s required under state statute.

It was conducted at the old Johnson Hardware building at 7th and Madison streets, aka Election Central.

The six votes for each candidate meant that the logic and accuracy test for the Hart InterCivic machines had passed with 100 percent accuracy, according to Bob White, with B&L IT Services. That’s the consultant used by Monroe County for technical election support. Continue reading “Monroe County voting machines pass required logic and accuracy test”

Election update: Voting machine accuracy test passed; Poll workers still needed; Registration deadline Oct. 5

At 8 a.m. on Wednesday, Monroe County’s election division started running its voting equipment through the logic and accuracy test that’s required under state statute.

After two hours of testing, the county’s equipment passed with a 100-percent score, deputy county clerk Tressia Martin told The Square Beacon.

The tests were conducted at the old Johnson Hardware Building, aka Election Central, at 7th and Madison streets. The blinds on the Madison Street side of the building were opened so that the public could watch, without going inside the building. It’s was a nod to helping prevent the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic virus.

The completion of the accuracy test crosses one more task off the list that election staff have to complete for the Nov. 3, 2020 general election.

In early September, the board of elections had settled on 28 different polling locations for the county’s 82 precincts.  That decision was given approval by the county’s board of commissioners at its regular meeting Wednesday morning, shortly after the logic and accuracy test concluded. Continue reading “Election update: Voting machine accuracy test passed; Poll workers still needed; Registration deadline Oct. 5”