Analysis: Most Bloomington annexation remonstrance waivers not valid under 2019 law, population density unevenly spread

On Aug. 4, starting at 3 p.m. a public hearing will be held by Bloomington’s city council on eight separate annexation ordinances.

If all eight areas were annexed, more than 9,000 acres and 14,000 people would be added to the city of Bloomington.

In the lead-up to the Aug. 4 hearing, three public meetings have been held to present the findings of a financial consultant, hired by Monroe County commissioners to review the city of Bloomington’s fiscal plan for its proposed annexations of territory.

On those three occasions, much of the energy in the room addressed questions about the process for stopping Bloomington’s annexation plans. And many of those questions have centered on the status of remonstrance waivers.

Key to the formal remonstrance process are waivers that might be associated with a parcel. Some parcels have waivers attached. Others don’t.

How many of the waivers are valid? What’s the geographic distribution of parcels that have a waiver? How do parcels with waivers square up with population density?

First, a short answer: The majority of remonstrance waivers look like they’re too old to count under a 2019 law. That means a petition signature from a property owner will likely count under the 2019 law, even if there’s a waiver attached.

Another short answer: The geographic distribution of waivers is uneven, and does not necessarily line up with the measured population density from the 2010 US Census.

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