IU Health moves operations to new hospital, first baby already delivered

In a news release issued mid-afternoon on Sunday, IU Health announced that the first baby had been born at its new hospital, which is located off the SR 46 bypass on the east side of town.

The news release states: “Parents Naomi and Miguel Ramirez welcomed their child Nahla shortly after 11 a.m. on Sunday, Dec. 5 and are happy to report that mom and baby are doing well.”

It was in the early morning hours of Sunday, Dec. 5 that IU Health started its move from the hospital at 2nd and Rogers Street. The facility, which IU Health now calls the legacy IU Health Bloomington Hospital, is now slated for demolition, before it is transferred to the city of Bloomington in a $6.5-million real estate deal.

At 4 p.m. Sunday afternoon, the transport activity around the old site had diminished, but several cars were still parked in the lot at 2nd and Rogers. Over the next hour or so, a few hospital workers emerged from the building, walked down the stairway, got in their cars, and drove off.

A while later, an IU Health ambulance, with lights and siren blaring, sped east down 2nd Street—apparently responding to a call, not performing a transport.

Even though the general location of the new facility is often described as off the SR 46 bypass, the driveways to the hospital are off Discovery Parkway, which was formerly known as Range Road.

Heading east on Discovery Parkway, after the turn from SR 46, two hospital entrances come up immediately on the left. The emergency room is off the second entrance.

After the jump: Photos from IU Health’s documentation of the move.

IU Health team members preparing the NICU at IU Health Bloomington at the Indiana University Regional Academic Health Center. IU Health Bloomington move day on Sunday, December 5, 2021 (Photo credit: IU Health).
Lifeline transport brings new patients to IU Health Bloomington at the Indiana University Regional Academic Health Center. IU Health Bloomington move day on Sunday, December 5, 2021 (Photo credit: IU Health).
Lifeline prepares to transport a NICU patient to IU Health Bloomington at the Indiana University Regional Academic Health Center. IU Health Bloomington move day on Sunday, December 5, 2021 (Photo credit: IU Health).
Lifeline transport prepares to depart the legacy IU Health Bloomington Hospital in route to IU Health Bloomington at the Indiana University Regional Academic Health Center. IU Health Bloomington move day on Sunday, December 5, 2021 (Photo credit: IU Health).
IU Health team members prepare a room for NICU patient at IU Health Bloomington at the Indiana University Regional Academic Health Center. IU Health Bloomington move day on Sunday, December 5, 2021 (Photo credit: IU Health).
Lifeline prepares to transport a NICU patient to IU Health Bloomington at the Indiana University Regional Academic Health Center. IU Health Bloomington move day on Sunday, December 5, 2021 (Photo credit: IU Health).
Lifeline transport brings NICU patient to IU Health Bloomington at the Indiana University Regional Academic Health Center. IU Health Bloomington move day on Sunday, December 5, 2021 (Photo credit: IU Health).
Lifeline transport departs legacy IU Health Bloomington Hospital in route to IU Health Bloomington at the Indiana University Regional Academic Health Center. IU Health Bloomington move day on Sunday, December 5, 2021 (Photo credit: IU Health).

5 thoughts on “IU Health moves operations to new hospital, first baby already delivered

  1. If I had a Christmas wish, it would be that everyone west of College and Walnut would stop using Bloomington Hospital and switch to Monroe Hospital. Let the rich east side pay for it. It’s only convenient to them, now. The money poured into the east side is disgusting and nothing’s more symptomatic of IU’s elitism than this monument to IU Health, now.

    1. I live on the east side. We are not all “rich”, BTW. When I drive to the west side of town I usually take the 45/46 bypass and I would encourage other west siders to do the same coming this way. It is convenient. One of the reasons for the decision on the location and collaboration with IU was to expand medical education opportunities for students in multiple fields. They will be sharing learning together in a new model for health education. .IU Health Bloomington has long since gone beyond being a local, community hospital and it offers expanded treatment options as a regional hub. Hence the name: Regional Academic Health Center.

      1. Have you ever read the demographic stats for the east side compared to west? Education? Household income? It’s like the diff between Europe and Africa. As for educational opportunities, a central site wouldn’t have hurt it even a little bit. Open your eyes and look at what they did. Golf course setting for rich people, with architecture to soothe rich people’s aesthetics. East side gets all our city’s money, parks, sidewalks…

  2. Thank you for clarifying that you were talking about the average. I was referring to the distribution of income and education, etc.. Using a mean/average is painting with a very broad brush. I bet there a few rich people and some who play golf over on the west side! Monroe Hospital seems like a nice community hospital but is hardly conveniently located.

    1. Ms. Carver, this is tedious. You’re denying what’s obvious to anyone who’s lived in Bloomington for even a month, let alone decades. You’re speaking of mean/average is just obfuscation. After twenty years living on the east side (47401 zip code), we moved out to the west side (47403). Any zip code comparison site will prove the wealth of the east side in a moment: Eg. homes with household income above $100k in 47401 is 20% with 47403 at 9%. Residents with BA or grad degree in 47401 is 43% with 47403 at 23%. Median home value in 47401 is 203k with 47403 at 129k. African-American east side 47401 population is half that of west side 47403 whereas Asian east side 47401 population is triple that of west side 47403. I won’t bother continuing, but only reiterate what was said from the first: Bloomington’s city council caters to the east side in their expenditures and services. Sidewalks. Parks. Hospital…

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